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No, the Higgs Boson Won't Cure Cancer . . .

. . . but I kinda want a part of the LHC anyway.

Sorry, the Higgs Boson won't cure cancer or help you lose weight.
Snake oil salesmen are terrible, despicable scumbags who take advantage of sick people desperately in search of cures, often for painful and terminal ailments.

It's particularly bothersome to me when people use pseudo-scientific physics (pseudophysics?) to steal from the infirm and uninformed. Devices that protect you from harmless cell phone radiation, healing crystals, and magnets for your shoes are just a few of the scams that come to mind.

Now some shysters have gone the extra mile by selling what they claim to be scraps from the Large Hadron Collider that supposedly have acquired healing powers by being near the places where the Higgs Boson were detected.

The website where you can purchase a completely innocuous ball bearing ($199) or random bolt or nut ($149) is called GodParticle4u.

One thing that really bothers me, besides the false hope they're passing off on suffering victims, is that fact that some people (like me) would actually consider paying exorbitant prices to own a legitimate piece of the LHC. If it weren't for the pseudo-scientific gibberish the website is loaded with, and the fact that there's no way to know if the scrap their selling was ever even near the LHC, I would seriously consider saving my pennies to place an order.

I've sent inquiries to a few people who can tell me if it's possible that the con artists may have a few LHC bits to sell, but haven't gotten any word back yet.

I know none of our readers will fall for this garbage, but I hope they'll keep an eye out for anyone they know who might have gotten taken in and straighten them out.

On the other hand, I hope someday there's a way to own a certified piece of one to the most important scientific instruments ever built. I'd buy something like that in a heartbeat.


Comments

  1. A fool and his money are soon parted.

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  2. Not surprising. Small scamsters often hang onto a giant scam. Falsehood breeds falsehood.

    In this case I'd rather see a few hundreds going to the small fraudster than the billions and billions and billions going to the evil monsters who run LHC.

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    Replies
    1. Why are the people who run the LHC evil?

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