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Phriday Fizzicts Phun!


Here's some Phriday Fizzicts Phunnies for you. Know any good ones? Leave them in our comments section below!

A Higgs Boson walks into a bar. The bartender looks up and says "Hey! You just missed some guys who were in here looking for you!"
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Erwin Schroedinger is driving down the autobahn when he gets a flat tire. He pulls over to the shoulder and inspects the damage. As a theorist by trade, though, he's not sure how to change a tire. Many hours pass before a police officer shows up to help. Looking for the spare, he asks Schroedinger to pop his trunk.

Policeman: "Did you know you have a dead cat in here?"

Schroedinger: "Well I do NOW!”
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Q: Who was the first electricity detective?
A: Sherlock Ohms
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Q: Where does bad light end up?
A: In a prism.
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Does a radioactive cat have 18 half-lives?
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In Munich, there's a sign that says, "Heisenberg might have slept here."
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(So old, yet so good...)
Two atoms are walking down the street. One stops and exclaims: I think I lost an electron.

The other replies: Really? Are you sure?

The first replies: Yes, I'm positive.
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The neutron walks into the bar and asks how much for a beer, and the bartender says: For you, no charge.
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More jokes from: Jupiter Scientific & NPR.


[Physics at the University of Maryland]

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