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Overlooked Physics: The Mysterious Drinking (Dipping) Bird

With all of our brain power working on grand experiments like the LHC and pondering big questions about black holes, we occasionally run into some seemingly simple mysteries. For instance, how does a dipping bird work? Or will a slinky perpetually slink down an ascending escalator?








Please send us explanations and videos of you tackling these elusive mysteries. Who knows, we may post it up on the Physics Buzz Blog.

Comments

  1. Must be some Methylene Chloride in the air...

    http://morningcoffeephysics.wordpress.com/2008/11/09/physics-explained-through-a-drinking-dippy-bird/

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow! There seems to be a lot of controversy surrounding the Physics of the drinking bird.

    Thank you Chris Ing for the link. But I would like to suggest that everyone try to come up with their own explanation before following the link.

    ReplyDelete

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