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My /. picks for the week

I've been catching up with my slashdot reading this morning - here are some of my favs from the last week (click the titles for the rest of the story):

FLYING WIND FARMS
...pioneer wind-power engineers are looking higher in the sky for new sources of energy. Conventional turbines will not take them there—the highest to date is just over 200 metres tall. So they are trying to invent a whole new technology for harvesting wind: electricity generators that fly.

DONKEY KONG CLIMBS E2
Donkey Kong was the first appearance of the Itallian plumber we now know as Mario. While this game's early '80s arcade popularity predates most of today's engineering students, it represents the amazing results that a small development team can produce...this work [6400 Post-t notes, 10 people, 5 hours] is visible at the E2 building at UCSC...


EINSTEIN WAS RIGHT, PROBE SHOWS
Early results from a Nasa mission designed to test two key predictions of Albert Einstein show the great man was right about at least one of them.



ARE MOBILE PHONES WIPING OUT OUR BEES?
...some scientists suggest that our love of the mobile phone could cause massive food shortages, as the world's harvests fail.

They are putting forward the theory that radiation given off by mobile phones and other hi-tech gadgets is a possible answer to one of the more bizarre mysteries ever to happen in the natural world - the abrupt disappearance of the bees that pollinate crops...




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