Friday, October 13, 2006

Controversy-Plagued Element 118, the Heaviest Atom Yet, Finally Discovered


Element 118 has been created in experiments conducted at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in Dubna, Russia by a collaboration of researchers from Russia's Joint Institute for Nuclear Research and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.

Element 118, the heaviest element yet found, was produced through collisions that fused together Californium and Calcium atoms. Although element 118 is too unstable to detect directly, the presence of daughter elements resulting from the decay of element 118 gave clues to its fleeting existence.

Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory previously reported the synthesis of element 118 in 1999, and later retracted their results when subsequent experiments failed to confirm their discovery. It was alleged that researcher Victor Ninov fabricated the experimental data that indicated the formation of element 118 atoms.

The (re)discovery was reported in the American Physical Society journal Physical Review C on October 9, 2006.

86 comments:

  1. first comment!

    and amazing!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Congratulations. I wonder who this one will be named after... The last few were Roentgenium and Darmstadtium, so I wonder if this will be named after the place WHERE they discovered it or WHO discovered it...
    Or, if the IUPAC wants *direct* proof that it was synthesized. I guess we'll have to wait and see.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. can you tell me what the pseudoscience behind this is asap please

      Delete
  3. I kind of like Dubnatonium

    ReplyDelete
  4. Notfakethistimeium?

    ReplyDelete
  5. unstableandpointelessium

    ReplyDelete
  6. What about Californication??
    LOL

    ReplyDelete
  7. Sorry I meant "Californicatium"...

    My wife suggests "Schwartzeneggium"

    ReplyDelete
  8. What about... "Element 118" ?

    Nobody tought of that.. uh?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Take the example of Sweden's lovely village of Ytterby, which inspired the names Terbium, Yttrium, Ytterbium, Erbium.

    Dubna doesn't give us much to work with - Dubnium, Ubnium, I guess.

    But Livermore: Livermorium, Vermorium, Liverium (Livorium), Morium, Livium, Ermorium, Iverium, Ivermorium, ....

    And that's not counting whatever names can be gleaned from the local wineries as well as the nicknames of obscure hardware, computer, and physics toys "out back in the shack i mean warehouse."

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'm going to go with "Ununoctium" for now...

    ReplyDelete
  11. yeah what's to gain by creating a fleeting atom?

    ReplyDelete
  12. Its wonderful to see the slashdot crowd spreading their charming wit to other sites on the web.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Since it's so short lived, how about "Fleetium"?

    ReplyDelete
  14. ninefourfivefiveohium?

    /livermore native

    ReplyDelete
  15. I honestly don't understand the use of creating heavier elements. Each and every element that is heavier than the next is also more unstable the next. Hydrogen is then obviously the most stable.

    The reason is quite simple. As you pack on the protons and neutrons the nuclear forces begin to dwindle significantly. With elements such as 118, they last only a microsecond before gravity and the other forces tear the atom apart.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I honestly don't understand the use of creating heavier elements. Each and every element that is heavier than the next is also more unstable the next. Hydrogen is then obviously the most stable.

    The reason is quite simple. As you pack on the protons and neutrons the nuclear forces begin to dwindle significantly. With elements such as 118, they last only a microsecond before gravity and the other forces tear the atom apart.

    If you're thinking we can make use of this with new steel components that will resist thousands and thousands of degrees of heat or something, it isn't going to happen :(. The most useful elements, and they still are, are well under atomic weights of 100.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Actually, Hydrogen isn't the most stable. That honour belongs to iron (Fe-56).
    Elements on either side tend towards iron; thus we can obtain energy from Hydrogen fusion, or Uranium fission. However, the heavier (>118) elements may have "islands of stability", so some of them may be unexpectedly long-lived.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Actually, the real race is on to create element 114. There is a theory that it has a balance of protons and neutrons needed to be within an 'island of stability' that will allow the created element to exist for quite some time.

    As it turns out, the internal nuclear structure of an atom is an ordered collection of protons and neutrons, instead of a random jumble.

    http://focus.aps.org/story/v4/st8 (Back in 1999)

    ReplyDelete
  19. I've always liked "unobtainium". This would be a good name.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Element 114? Stable?

    Nope.

    Check here for answers:

    http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/Uuq/key.html

    ReplyDelete
  21. "The reason is quite simple. As you pack on the protons and neutrons the nuclear forces begin to dwindle significantly. With elements such as 118, they last only a microsecond before gravity and the other forces tear the atom apart."

    Gravity hardly matters on that scale...the force that you're looking for is known as the 'coulombic force' (electromagnetic force). Also, forces don't 'dwindle' when more bodies are introduced...they tend to decrease with an increase in spacing between the bodies involved.

    More 'nucleons' or nuclear particles (protons and neutrons) means greater spacing between the outer ones which in turn means less nuclear binding force between those particles to counteract the coulombic force.

    Finally, your contention that things that exist ephemerally cannot possibly be of actual human use ignores key human technologies.

    Like candles.

    Thank goodness we haven't yet succumb to the wisdom that "photons only exist for a fraction of a second, so why make them?"

    ReplyDelete
  22. name it "ghbketamine"

    ReplyDelete
  23. (cant believe someone else didnt think of that first)

    ReplyDelete
  24. Regarding element 114: Computations do suggest that 114 is a "magic" number of nuclear structure, and so elements with this number of protons should be more stable. The key word here is "more" - the half life will probably be much longer than nearby heavy elements, but still very short.

    You might be able to make an isotope of element-114 with a very long half life, perhaps even a stable isotope, if the number of neutrons is also a magic number, say 184. The problem is that it's very hard to make a nucleus with a neutron/proton ratio that high. For example, you'd have to collide Californium-255 with something like Sulfur-43, which doesn't exit.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Hardly any information on this. What is the estimated half life? What a lame "article." Need more information.

    Here is my article "ELEMENT 190 made today in my house."

    ReplyDelete
  26. Wait.. what about this episode of NOVA SCIENCE NOW, about the "Island of Stability"?

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/3313/02.html

    ReplyDelete
  27. Let's go Trekkie...

    dilithium!
    vorilium!
    olivine!
    triadium!
    trillium!
    topalime!
    ...
    http://www.mineralogicalrecord.com/pdfs/STAR%20TREK%20Article.pdf

    ReplyDelete
  28. ...Although element 118 is too unstable to detect directly, the presence of daughter elements resulting from the decay of element 118 gave clues to its fleeting existence.

    I suggest georgebushium

    ReplyDelete
  29. Dubyatonium, in honor or Our Fearless Leader

    ReplyDelete
  30. How about KillDieEatPuffManium?

    ReplyDelete
  31. How about Hellomitchellium

    ReplyDelete
  32. News just in we've discovered 114
    I shall call it Itsamiracleium

    ReplyDelete
  33. may the force be with u

    ReplyDelete
  34. i discovered 119 atom!

    ReplyDelete
  35. -Spartan117ium
    -Halo2rocksium
    -Spazbotium
    -Iumium
    -somethingweknownothingaboutium

    My Friend discovered the base of all elements: it is named Ium

    My gamertag is ghost3300 add me on xbox live!

    ReplyDelete
  36. Greetings earthlings
    We have taken over your radioooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

    ReplyDelete
  37. A wise man once said:
    "Element number 118 will bring great destruction to the Earth when it is discovered so do not eat it". He also said:
    "Name the element ExplodetheEarthium, or you will suffer the wise man's wrath".

    My favourite element is Titanium.

    Everyone go to www.ngu.com.au because it is a good website

    ReplyDelete
  38. I like nerdaranium

    ReplyDelete
  39. i wonder who just said that!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  40. i know everything but I'm not tellinOctober 16, 2006 at 2:49 AM

    We can't make 114 stable, yet anyway, why the decision to have another? IMHO stable productive whateverisism clearly requires an ingredient you can buy in the grocery - SPAM!
    SPAM SPAM SPAM SPAM spam spam spam.....

    ReplyDelete
  41. I'd call it anything but late for dinner.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Photons do not exist for a fraction of a second. They exist for an instant. A literal instant - they are created, travel, and are destroyed simutainously, with no time at all passing between.

    Hence the question used to annoy those who dont know the basics of relativity: How old is the light from a star x light years away?

    Time dilation is fun.

    ReplyDelete
  43. I think the Russians should decide what to name it (and they will).

    ReplyDelete
  44. i suggest uselessium

    ReplyDelete
  45. "...Although element 118 is too unstable to detect directly, the presence of daughter elements resulting from the decay of element 118 gave clues to its fleeting existence.

    I suggest georgebushium"
    And i agree

    ReplyDelete
  46. after the post at 5:36 AM I suggest

    Ytzfereelium.

    ReplyDelete
  47. It's probably a conspiracy. Element 118 probably doesn't really exist. :P

    ReplyDelete
  48. Novotnium. From the name of my first calculus teacher who didn't understand that normally body language accounts for 85% of communications, except in calculus classes. Speaking English would have probably helped me pass.

    ReplyDelete
  49. sweet! another element...more joyous chemistry and physics to study eventually!

    ReplyDelete
  50. C'mon. We gotta call it Dilithium.

    ReplyDelete
  51. How about Hydrogen Jr. Yeah, I like Hydrogen Jr.

    ReplyDelete
  52. incredibly cool, an atom that exists for about0.00000000000000001 of a second and then disappears. i mean isnt it cool, although i think the time used to create these things could be used to make somthin better.

    ReplyDelete
  53. ITemplatez.com offers professional web templates, flash templates ,swish templates, dreamweaver templates, and other web design productsavailable for immediate download.

    ReplyDelete
  54. The half life as posted on various is 30 seconds for one of the isotopes. This is several orders of magnitude longer than many of the nearby elements.

    ReplyDelete
  55. Great work. Thanks for this information

    ReplyDelete
  56. Thanks for giving this information about the chemistry and physics related subjects and topics,too informative.
    Modelle milano

    ReplyDelete
  57. Too inovative and knowledgeable article about the subjects,Thanks for giving such informative blog that is more useful for the science field.

    ReplyDelete
  58. The higher the atomic number, the more electrons an atom has. The more electrons, the more shells. The more shells, the larger the atomic radius. The larger the atomic radius, the weaker the grip on the outer electrons.
    This means that the attraction between the protons in the nucleus and the electrons in the outer orbitals is too weak to keep the electrons in orbit.

    ReplyDelete
  59. Pretty good post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wanted to say that I have really enjoyed reading your blog posts. Any way I’ll be subscribing to your feed and I hope you post again soon.

    ReplyDelete